Thursday, 2 June 2011

As Wicked as Saddam - but Will This Tyrant Face the Same Consequences?

WARNING - THIS REPORT CONTAINS HARROWING INFORMATION.
A 13-year-old boy has been tortured to death by security forces in Syria. 
  Hamza Ali al-Khateeb had his genitals cut off, was battered and knee-capped by Syria's vile security police - Daily Mail link.  The child has now become a symbol of the Syrian uprising, which is now entering its seventh week. 
   Guardian report: 'According to a YouTube video and human rights activists, Hamza was tortured and his swollen body showed bullet wounds on his arms, black eyes, cuts, marks consistent with electric shock devices, bruises and whip marks. His neck had been broken and his penis cut off.' - link.
  Exiled human rights campaigner Radwan Ziadeh said, '(His death) is the sign of the sadism of the Assad regime and its security forces... Torture is usual in Syria. It’s not something new or strange. What is special about Hamza is that he was only 13 years old. He really is a child.' 
  The family were warned to silence, but in a brave act of defiance they posted footage of his corpse on line.  His father, uncle and brother have all been detained, according to human rights activists.  Syria is controlled by gangster-thug Bashar al-Assad, who's Ambassador to Britain had originally been invited to the recent Royal Wedding - BBC link.   

  Al-Assad (link) is leader of his country's Ba'ath Party, a version of which were the parasitical regime that bled Iraq dry.  Nearby is Bahrain, who's government thugs are mounting an ongoing campaign against pro-democracy protestors; those injured are too frightened to go to hospital.  Nurses and doctors are routinely attacked there - video link.  Despite that, in a snub to working people from Britain to the Middle East and a display of solidarity with putrid despots everywhere, the Crown Prince of Bahrain was invited to the wedding by Royal flunkies.
Night view from the top of East London Mosque
  From Wikipedia's Assad page -
'A 2007 law required internet cafes to record all the comments users post on chat forums. Websites such as Wikipedia Arabic, YouTube and Facebook were blocked intermittently between 2008 and February 2011.
  Human Rights groups, such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, have detailed how Bashar's regime and secret police routinely torture, imprison, and kill political opponents, and those who speak out against the regime.
Since 2006 it expanded the use of travel bans against dissidents, a practice that is illegal under international law. Syria is the worst offender among Arab states.
In an interview with ABC News in 2007 he stated: 'We don't have such [things as] political prisoners,' yet the New York Times reported the arrest of 30 political prisoners in Syria in December 2007.'

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